Twenty-First Century Lèse-Majesté?: Erdoğan and Free Speech in Europe

Matthew Petti, JHU, European Horizons: The trial of Jan Böhmermann sits at the intersection of constitutional law and geopolitics. Böhmermann, a German comedian accused of writing a dirty poem about the president of Turkey, is now on trial for insulting a foreign head of state after Chancellor Merkel allowed the charges to move forwards. The […]

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How Western World Involvement Intensified the Crisis in Syria

Giana Dawod, JHU: Moscow’s decision earlier last week to end its combat mission in Syria fell on the grim 5th anniversary of the country’s conflict. What began as political protest spiraled into a civil war, sparking the world’s worst humanitarian crisis in decades, and spawning a new global terrorist threat. Starting as peaceful anti-government demonstrations, […]

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Geopolitics and the Invisible Battlefield of the Syrian War

Ashby Henningsen, UMBC: Few armed conflicts occur within a vacuum in terms of their repercussions; when tensions between states or movements erupt, the political and strategic impacts often extend far beyond the borders of the countries immediately engaged. Few conflicts of the new millennium have demonstrated this as dramatically as the Syrian Civil War. Besides […]

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The Compassion Gap: A Western World’s Disparate Reaction to Conflict

Anna Quinn, Loyola University Maryland: About two weeks ago, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 4038, the American Security Against Foreign Enemies (SAFE) Act of 2015. The bill, which is currently being debated in the Senate, prevents Syrian refugees from entering the U.S. until they undergo a more rigorous vetting process—the most stringent ever required […]

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The Situation in Syria is Worse than Ever, and Worse Than You Thought

George Gulino, JHU: ISIS, or rather Daesh, has come back into focus as a chief international security threat since the attacks in Paris on November 13th. Almost simultaneous suicide bombings/hostage killings at the soccer stadium Stade de France, the Bataclan concert hall and a few bars and restaurants claimed the lives of 130 and injured […]

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The Facts Behind Refugees

Anna Benham, JHU: After the attacks on Paris earlier this November, the American political rhetoric has been loaded and tense. This past week, Republican Presidential candidate Ben Carson referred to refugees as “rabid dogs”, and Governor Bobby Jindal instructed the National Guard to “track” refugees. This forces the United States to re-examine what the words […]

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Where Should They Go?

Will Theodorou, JHU: Due to the ongoing civil war in Syria, the country’s citizens continue to seek asylum in Europe. The Syrian Refugee Crisis began in 2011 and, since then, approximately 4,183,535 Syrians have left their home in search of safety. Turkey has handled the biggest burden, hosting approximately half of the total refugees and […]

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